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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Looking at a super small and concealable gun that can fire big bullets ? The concept of a Derringer (originally Deringer, with one “r”) has remained immensely popular since its inception. And that idea has kept these tiny defensive powerhouses in production for over 150 years. Early 1900s Remington Arms-U.

5 Best Derringers: Our Favorite Tiny Bois

5 Best Derringers: Our Favorite Tiny BoisTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Looking at a super small and concealable gun that can fire big bullets ? The concept of a Derringer (originally Deringer, with one “r”) has remained immensely popular since its inception. And that idea has kept these tiny defensive powerhouses in production for over 150 years. Early 1900s Remington Arms-U.M.C. Type III Double Derringer, Rock Island Auction House Today, many people choose to carry a Derringer as a backup weapon, or as an easy pocket carry option that still has the power to stop a threat with authority. That said, most people default to similarly sized pocket guns like the Ruger LCP and the like now, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. A small gun, with a heavy trigger, difficult-to-operate hammer, and a perilously short sight radius isn’t exactly an ideal self-defense gun, especially when there are so many easier to use options available. Carrying a Derringer isn’t limited to pockets anymore! If you’re interested in a modern derringer, you have a few options to choose from, and you should think long and hard about what you need and whether or not you’re getting a quality product. Looking for something that’s tiny, cheap, and chambered in a caliber starting with “4” is a great way to accidentally buy a hand grenade if you aren’t careful. Be sure to do your research thoroughly. Or you can just get one of the great derringers on this list. …But First, a Little Background on Derringers Way back in 1852, John Deringer (one “r”) came up with the idea for a small, easily-concealed pistol with a large bore that could be conveniently carried in the outer pocket of a gentleman’s coat. Civilized men in 1857 wore coats with small pockets. Called the Philadelphia Deringer, it immediately caught on and spawned a huge number of copies which, to avoid trademark issues were sold as Derringers (with two “r”s). Capitalism happened, and the name of the copy stuck. Today, derringers are sold all over the world and are still incredibly popular with those looking to defend themselves, but mostly they are novelties, range toys, and just interesting things to have around. That said, they’ll still put a big hole in a threat, so don’t discount them for self-defense, even if there are better options out there these days. Philadelphia Deringer So if you’re looking for a modern derringer, where should you start? I’m glad you asked. Here are the best, and most practical, derringers on the market. Best Derringers 1. Bond Arms Backup Bond Arms is a name you’ll hear a lot when looking at derringers, and with good reason: they’re basically the industry standard, and to my knowledge one of very few manufacturers that put serious effort into derringers these days. The Backup is one of their most popular models and is chambered in a wrist-friendly caliber: .45 ACP. Like most of their products however, you can quickly and easily do a caliber swap and drop in different length and caliber barrels as you see fit. Best .45 ACP Self-Defense Federal .45 ACP 230 gr HST 28 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 28 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing This is one of the best things about the Bond Arms series of derringers. There are about 20 different calibers available to choose from when it comes to accessory barrels. This one ships with a 2.5” barrel, which is plenty of barrel for the type of “get off me” shooting these guns are designed for. I wouldn’t want to have to shoot much past 7 yards, but inside that distance, which is where most self-defense scenarios happen, this thing is more than capable of ruining a bad guys day . "Bond Arms Backup" 450 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 450 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing In fact, as a backup weapon for either pocket carry, or to keep in an ankle holster, I think it’s pretty excellent. It’s definitely not perfect, and any kind of multi-target engagement is going to be a problem, but for what it is, and for the most common self-defense scenarios, it does perfectly well. And while you may not want to carry that Glock 19 because you’re “just running to the store” or “just checking the mail” this thing can easily be dropped into a pocket and forgotten about, right up until you need it. Please…don’t be this guy… Like most (all) derringers, the trigger is stiff, and the hammer is hard to pull back so make sure you have the hand strength to handle that and don’t expect to be hitting anything further than 10 yards or so reliably, but for a “bad breath distance” gun it’s definitely worth considering. Would I take it over a Glock 43 ? Not if I could help it. Would I take it over nothing at all? Absolutely. 2. Bond Arms Snake Slayer The Snake Slayer is Bond Arms’ most popular model, and comes with a 3.5” barrel, and is available chambered in either .357 Mag/.38 Special, or .45 LC/.410. Either way, you get a little more barrel, a little less recoil, and a lot more accuracy over the Backup model, especially with the .357 Mag version. "Bond Arms Snake" Slayer 511 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 511 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Sportsman's Guide (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Overall, I’d say the Backup is probably ideal as exactly that…a backup. Whereas this is better as a primary weapon. The sight radius, such as it is, is almost usable, and the caliber options give you a little more flexibility as well. The .45LC/.410 one, in particular, is a favorite of hunters and outdoorsmen in snake country, as you might have expected from the name, and the .357/.38 version gives you more options when it comes to defending yourself against two-legged threats. (L to R), .45 ACP, .45 Long Colt, .45-70 Government As with most of Bond Arms’ products, you can swap barrels out to your heart’s content, but for me, I like the .357/.38 one an awful lot. Between those two cartridges, you will never struggle to find ammo, and you’ll be well equipped to deal with most anything short of a bear or other dangerous game. The .410 option gives you a good defense against snakes and other small pests, and can even offer some good survival weapon potential. In fact, I’d say a Bond Arms Snake Slayer is a pretty great little survival gun for a lightweight bugout kit, or just as something to keep in your pack when you’re wandering the backcountry. .410 Birdshot and Self Defense Rounds They also fit nicely in a glovebox or center console to help keep you safe from everything from carjackers to that rattlesnake curled up in the barn. I think the survival gun last ditch truck gun tackle box gun is where derringers really shine anyway, places where you need something small and light to tuck out of the way, so something like the Snake Slayer really makes sense in that respect. 3. Bond Arms Ranger II The Bond Arms Ranger II is probably the easiest derringer to shoot on this list. It comes with a 4.25” barrel which is honestly bigger than what most people would expect from a derringer. That’s a very useful and usable barrel length no matter how you slice it, and it does well with the .410/.45LC barrels. Bond Arms Snake Slayer 511 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 511 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Sportsman's Guide (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It does all the same things as the other derringers, but there’s one place you may see them that you wouldn’t otherwise expect: cowboy action competition . These things are wildly popular there, and I can only imagine it’s because they are positively tame when shooting soft-recoiling cowboy action loads. Even if you’re not planning on living out your wild west fantasies, the Ranger II is a great choice. For one, if you’re locked into getting a derringer, this is one of the most practical ones out there. You can even get holsters for it! You get all the solid upsides of a derringer in that it is simple, easy to use, and virtually bombproof, and you get all that in a fairly usable package that you can either take into the woods as a backup, or keep on you to have a fair chance of defending yourself when you don’t feel like taking a larger or heavier gun. And of course, for something that’s just plain fun to shoot at the range, or during a cowboy action match you want to be a little silly with, there are few things better. This derringer won’t beat your hand up like the others either, so you won’t shoot it once and leave it in the back of the safe until you decide to trade it in towards a J-frame or something similar. What’s your take on the Bond Arms? Readers' Ratings 4.92/5 (170) Your Rating? 4. American Derringer Model M-4 Alaskan Are you looking for a survival derringer? I mean a derringer that will help you survive almost anything? Well, the "American Derringer Model" M-4 Alaskan may be exactly what you need. American Derringer Model M-4 Alaskan This thing has a 4.1” barrel chambered in .410/.45LC, which is pretty standard for derringers like this. This gives you the option of the big .45LC throwing serious bullets around, and also the versatility of the .410 which gives you a wide variety of options for what you can do with the gun. There are about a million .410 loads out there, and you can use all of them with this. But this derringer has another barrel. And it’s not chambered in .410, .45LC, .45 ACP, or anything else we’ve talked about so far. It’s chambered in .45-70 Govt. Hornady Lever Revolution .45-70 vs 5.56 If you’ve ever shot a rifle chambered in .45-70, you probably felt it in your shoulder the next day. I personally have no desire to ever shoot one again. No thank you. In a pistol? Not even a full-size revolver, but a derringer? I hope you have good insurance cause your wrist is in serious danger of splintering into a bunch of little pieces. Seriously, .45-70 Govt in a derringer that only weighs about a pound? I don’t know that I could even hold onto such a thing…or that I would want to. So why put it on this list? Why is it even a thing that exists? Surely it’s just a joke gun, right? A meme cannon to let your buddies shoot at the range with no practical value? Well…not quite. In this wide world, there are some big animals that never got the memo that we humans are the top of the food chain. In North America, this means bears. Even a big enough black bear is going to laugh at your Glock 19, especially if it’s already on top of you. Nothing on Earth is going to shrug off a .45-70 though, save maybe a whale. This is the ultimate contact distance gun for surviving a bear attack and I think as a backup to either a 12 gauge, big-bore rifle, or a hefty revolver in something like .454 Casul, this is a neat thing to have. Ruger Super Redhawk in 45 Colt/454 Casull Set Up to Hunt I trust my life to a shotgun in big bear territory, and I think that this shouldn’t be your number one option, but as a light back up? As a last ditch effort to get a 1000lb Grizzly off of you, or at least take the big asshole with you? I’ll take it over trying to hit the thing with an empty shotgun or revolver, that’s for sure. As a survival gun that can pack down extremely light, and that can be used as a practical(ish) hunting weapon in case your plane goes down in Alaskan backcountry or your boat sinks or whatever, it certainly isn’t half bad either as you still have that other barrel that shoots the more practical .45LC and .410 loads. Just make sure you don’t accidentally touch off the .45-70 load instead. Finally, it’s just a freakin’ hilarious thing to own. A .45-70 derringer is something that is almost worth owning just to say you have one, and occasionally breaking it out at the range is certainly going to turn some heads. There is one problem…it doesn’t look like you can get these new anymore, so you have to fend for yourself on ArmsList or Gunbroker . Honorable Mention There are a few guns out there that a lot of people call a “derringer” even though they don’t technically meet the accepted definition, or aren’t quite a normal derringer. These are the sort of thing that you might also be interested in if derringers are your thing. And there’s one thing most of you were probably thinking of when you started reading this article… NAA Mini Revolvers NAA specializes in some really well-designed, good looking, and surprisingly functional mini revolvers chambered in .22LR, .22 Short, or .22 Mag. These little revolvers are in some cases little bigger than a swiss army knife and carry 5 rounds of .22 in a shockingly usable package. NAA Mini Revolvers 215 at Sportsman's Guide Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 215 at Sportsman's Guide Prices accurate at time of writing They also make full-size revolvers and such, but their mini revolvers are definitely the big crowd pleaser here. At 4” long, and weighing in at less than 5oz, your biggest problem might be leaving one in your jeans and forgetting it’s in there. .22 LR isn’t the world’s best self-defense round by any means, but I don’t think anyone wants to get shot by one either. As a contact-distance weapon, it’s certainly better than nothing, especially if you can shove it against your attackers head or face, and at distances of a few feet, it’ll do alright. NAA Mini Revolvers 2 This is definitely not my first choice for self-defense, but any port is better than being out on the sea in a storm, and any gun you have on you is better than not having one at all when your life’s on the line. Beyond self-defense, good lord are these things fun. They have almost no recoil, are surprisingly accurate if a bit challenging to use, and for plinking at the range, there are few things that will help your dollar stretch further ammo-wise. Final Thoughts The derringer may be a little old-fashioned but it hasn’t gone the way of the dodo just yet. There are still some people out there who carry them every day, whether because they like the idea of a lightweight pocket gun that they can always have on them, or because they’re just plain cool. Then again, they can be surprisingly fun at the range as well, and will certainly stand out from all the black rifles and polymer pistols that will be taking up the lanes all around you. Whatever your reason, if you’re looking to own a derringer, there are some great options out there, including some ones that make great carry guns, great survival weapons, or great range toys. What do you think of derringers? Which one of these is your favorite? Let me hear from you in the comments! For some more…normal CCW weapons, check out our Best Concealed Carry Guns guide!

How a Legitimate Gun Broker Can be Branded as a Bad Apple

How a Legitimate Gun Broker Can be Branded as a Bad Apple

There have been many debates recently about gun broker accountability concerning the number of firearms used in criminal activity with gun control advocates and firearm buyers and dealers each arguing for their point of view. The fact is that the truth is always somewhere in the middle and while nobody can say that all the gun dealers across the U.S. are one hundred percent honest in their practices, it seems absurd to start branding some gun brokers as evil-doers by only relying on one-sided, inaccurate information. What I mean by inaccurate information is, for instance, one of the claims presented in a recent video released by the Brady Campaign, in which representatives of the project explain how, by looking at the records, it was determined that 1 percent of gun brokers sell about 60 percent of guns that are used in crimes in the U.S. It’s easy to be shocked by such statistics and jump on the gun trader hate band wagon but, like with everything else, double check the information that you’re given before drawing any conclusions. The reason I’m saying this isn’t because I believe that the people advocating for gun control are completely wrong in everything they say, it’s that no matter how noble you believe your purpose to be and how strong you think your arguments are, you shouldn’t misinform people in order to get them to support the same things you do. That’s just wrong no matter who does it, pro-gun lobbyists or gun control supporters alike. And in this case, you have a very influential movement completely disregarding several facts concerning the statistics they are presenting. Statistics should be properly explained and presented regardless of what your personal beliefs are when you use them in support of your cause. And the problem here is that, when you claim that the one percent of dealers that sell 60 percent of the guns used in crimes is comprised of “bad apples”, you may actually be hurting legitimate firearm retailers. Why a legitimate gun broker can be part of the 1 percent There are several additional factors that influence the number of crime-connected guns that each gun broker has. How much these factors can increase that number turns out not to be irrelevant. Let me explain why this kind of logic can lead to wrongfully accusing legitimate business owners that comply with the law: if a firearm broker has substantially more sales than another one, it is normal that the number of guns that broker sells that will eventually be involved in criminal activity will be higher, that’s just math. More guns sold by the same retailer will lead to more guns involved in illegal activities that will be traced back to that retailer, that’s all there is to it. But other factors can contribute to more crime-associated guns being sold by one broker rather than another. You have to also take into account the selection of guns that each retailer offers as well as the area where they operate. It makes sense that someone who offers guns for sale in Texas, for example, will report a lower number than someone who sells guns in California, where the crime rate is higher. It also depends on the specific area where the retailer is located, not just the state. If a gun broker operates in a high crime area he has more chances of having a higher number of guns used in crimes traced back to him. Even if you were to disregard all of these factors you still cannot be 100 percent sure that a gun trader which has sold more guns involved in criminal activity is a “bad apple”, or that he knowingly sold a firearm to a criminal or a straw-purchaser. The problem is that when you call all of those gun brokers “bad apples” without discussing all of these additional factors that influence the statistics, you can make legitimate business owners seem like criminals when they are in fact doing nothing wrong. And that won’t help prevent gun violence it will just cause more people to post things like # gunbrokers # badapples on twitter without actually seeking information about what being a responsible firearm retailer entails. Does the problem really stem from gun traders? There have been unfortunate cases of shootings where people that could not clear a background check because of mental illness or domestic violence history managed to buy guns and then used them to murder people. But there are other sources that provide guns with no background check and no paperwork, including some less than adequate gun auction sites and shady online gun auctions. But most of the sites that offer illegal auction arms or sell guns without the proper paperwork are well hidden from the public eye on dark web pages. It’s not like you can type “illegal guns for sale websites” in your regular web browser and find sites like that. In fact, there are other easier ways to get a gun without a background check, including direct gun auctions held at different events or online auction websites. But the truth if that the majority of the people who chose to buy a gun don’t do it with the intention of doing anything illegal, they just love guns and want to invest in one. It’s easy to demonize guns if you look at things like shootings and murders and the way that they are portrayed in the mainstream media. But in most cases, people that use gun broker.com, walk into a legitimate gun retail store or bid in a gun auction are responsible gun owners that simply want to purchase a gun for one of many valid reasons. And regardless of whether you thing gun control should be stricter or not, painting a distorted picture of the “bad apples” you deem responsible for firearm-related crime rates is not going to help enforce new laws, it’s just going to create discrimination against legitimate businesses that are actually encouraging proper verifications for gun purchasers and are respecting the law.

Handgun Showdown Round 7: Glock 19 Gen 3 vs. Glock 19 Gen 4

Handgun Showdown Round 7: Glock 19 Gen 3 vs. Glock 19 Gen 4

A friend of mine asked me once, “What are the the first two words that come to mind when you hear the word ‘Glock’?” I said, “Reliability, perfection.” Up until today I’m not sure if I really should have said that second word. But it’s on Glock’s logo, and I’m a very visual person. Glocks are without a doubt some of the most reliable firearms in the world. Several countries’ military and law enforcement use them. Plastic gun fans swear by them. To say these handguns are reliable is an understatement — they’ve been submerged in water and mud and tortured to hell and back, and they would still spit lead like nobody’s business. That’s how reliable Glocks can be. “Perfection” as a concept, at least to me, is a misnomer. Not to be overly philosophical about it, but no matter how “perfect” something is, there will always be something better. Anyone can give me the highest number they can think of and I only need to add 1 to it, I’ll have a greater number. As the CEO of a world-renowned copier machine brand once said, “In the race for quality, there is no finish line.” Glocks are a lot of good things but perfect. True, some have been submerged in mud, but in one of those tests even the unsightly, cheaply-made Hi-Point beat a Glock in reliability. And Glocks are not immune to catastrophic failures either. No firearm is, in fact. If that’s not enough proof, consider the following argument: If these handguns were perfect, why is there always a newer generation of Glocks coming out every once in a while? Are we to assume that perfection just fades over time? In Round 7 of our Handgun Showdown series, we’re comparing two versions of the Glock 19: Gen 3 vs. Gen 4, to try and answer that question. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 The Tale of the Tape 2 So which one is better? 3 Conclusion The Tale of the Tape Generational Differences When the first Glock pistol ( Glock 17 ) was released in Austria in 1982, it caused quite a sensation. It wasn’t the first of its kind, sure — that honor belongs to the H&K VP70 which was produced in Germany in 1970. But it became the success that it is today because it just worked (that, and the VP70 had a terribly heavy ~20-lb. trigger pull weight ). It was so reliable that it was adopted by the Austrian military , a few years later by Norway and Sweden, and later in the 1990s by US law enforcers. Six years after, it got a few upgrades. People were probably complaining about not getting a secure purchase on the grip, so the newer Glock pistol grips got their front and rear straps checkered. The older plastic magazines also got an upgrade — the newer version had a metallic frame to reinforce the plastic , eliminating any possible feeding/chambering issues. The barrel and slide were reinforced while the recoil spring was integrated with the guide rod , becoming a single captive piece. To Glock enthusiasts, these changes marked the end of the first generation. Gen 2 was born. Gen 3 Up until 1990, all Glock pistols had a blocky grip area. Another six years later, the second generation got a bit of a makeover which improved the ergonomics as well as the aesthetics of these pistols. Finger grooves were added to the front of the grip , as well as a notch that serves as a thumb rest on both sides of the upper grip area. The dust cover on the frame got a nice upgrade: a rail for attaching lasers or flashlights . Glock calls this the Universal Rail, which would continue to be a feature in the next two generations. Aside from those visual changes, it got a new case extractor with an indicator. The user would know if the chamber is loaded. These changes in 1996 resulted in what’s known as the Glock Gen 3 , and up to this article’s writing, Gen 3 pistols are being sold on Glock’s website. But even if Gen 3 is the longest running generation of these plastic handguns , Glock didn’t stop “improving” on it. A feature that was added in later production Gen 3 models is an ambidextrous magazine release for left-hand shooters (which is odd because until Glock added that new ambidextrous mag release, all magazines including early third generation ones only had one release notch — on the right side — so this never really worked well, some owners even reported malfunctions because of this feature). In 2009, just a year before the newer fourth generation would be released, Glock started offering newer Rough Textured Frame (RTF) versions of their pistols. The RTF2 frame’s grip was textured with very aggressive needle-like checkering,  while the RTF3 had the same needle-like checkering that wasn’t as aggressive. The rear slide was also given curved serrations instead of the typical boring vertical ones. Gen 4 A year after the last cycle of upgrades for the their third generation pistols, Glock released the Gen 4 . Up to that point, they never really acknowledged the way enthusiasts categorized their pistols on “generational” improvements. Now, all new models that have significant design improvements compared to all previous Glock releases have “Gen 4” laser-etched on their slides, making them easily distinguishable even to those who aren’t Glock fanboys. In addition, Gen 4 models have other new features readily visible out of the box, the first and probably the most obvious is the finish. New Slide Finish Glock uses a salt-bath ferritic-nitrocarburizing process which, depending on who you ask , is labeled either Tenifer or Melonite (enthusiasts argue that the company has always used Tenifer until 2011 when they first started using Melonite — both are trademarked processes sold by the same company) to treat the slide’s surface for corrosion resistance. But the coating they use (on top of the treated slides) is a little different compared to previous versions, resulting in a lighter shade of gray finish in Gen 4 models. New Interchangeable Backstrap Options Gen 4 Glocks now come with different-size interchangeable backstraps in the box (along with three magazines as opposed to two in Gen 3s). This is to help different users (i.e. those with bigger hands) get a more solid purchase on the grip. A good grip allows for more accurate shots and better recoil control, as was discussed in Round 1 of this Handgun Showdown series. And this adaptive grip feature doesn’t only benefit people with larger hands , because to make sure people with smaller hands also profit, the company designed all Gen 4 pistol grips to be relatively thinner compared to all previous generation Glocks. New Checkering Texture Compared to Gen 3 models, not including RTF versions, Gen 4 grips have a more aggressive texturing. But unlike RTF versions with grips that had needle-like checkering, Gen 4 uses flat-cone-like checkering which is comfortable and easy on the hands while providing the same level of grip traction for easier recoil control. Larger Magazine Release Button Prior to Gen 4 being released, all Glock pistols suffered from a relatively minor but nonetheless annoying problem of having a small (almost miniscule to some), low-profile magazine release button. I say minor because for one, with enough practice, the smaller magazine release will eventually become easier to operate. And since most Glock pistols have high-capacity magazines anyway, this only really becomes a nuisance in the range. I also think that for typical self defense situations, a Glock 19 with 16 rounds of 9mm (15 in the mag and an additional round in the chamber) will be more than enough to stop any two-legged threat (unless you’re facing six or more bad guys, which is highly unlikely unless you’re in law enforcement or in the military, in which case an AR15 or a shotgun shouldn’t be out of reach — even if you’re not, most bad guys would run at the sound of a warning shot). Still, a lot of people were complaining about the tiny magazine release button on Gen 3 pistols. So for Gen 4, the company decided to make that button significantly larger. They also made it reversible out of the box instead of ambidextrous (drop-in aftermarket ambidextrous mag release buttons are still available for Gen 4s though). Left-handed shooters can easily put it on the gun’s left side so it can be pushed with the left thumb. And to make sure the reversible mag release will work reliably, all Gen 4 magazines now have a notch on both sides. New Recoil Spring Assembly Comparing the business end of a Gen 4 pistol to that of a Gen 3’s, the recoil guide rod’s diameter is bigger on the Gen 4. To accommodate the significant increase in the recoil guide rod’s diameter, Gen 4 slides have to have a bigger cutout portion in front, which means a Gen 3 recoil guide rod will not fit in a Gen 4 slide (unless you use an adapter ring that Glock sells). The recoil guide rod’s diameter being bigger on Gen 4 models is not for aesthetics though. There’s a mechanical reason behind this new feature. Gen 3 pistols chambered for .40 S&W use the exact same dimension recoil guide rod and recoil spring that Gen 3 9mm pistols use. Since Glocks were originally designed for the 9mm which has a weaker recoil compared to the .40 S&W, the recoil guide rod and recoil spring rated for 9mm recoil are considerably weaker against the snappy recoil of the .40 S&W. This resulted in faster frame wear in Gen 3 Glocks chambered for the .40 S&W. To alleviate this problem, Glock employed the use of a newly designed recoil guide rod-spring assembly. It now has two captive springs, a smaller and a larger one, and because of a larger spring is used this time, the recoil guide rod’s front end diameter also have to be increased. This new spring and guide rod assembly allows for better recoil force absorption that significantly minimizes frame wear and in turn results to better user recoil control in Gen 4 pistols chambered for any caliber higher than the 9mm. Better recoil control allows for faster sight re-acquisition and faster follow-up shots, as we determined in Round 2 of this Handgun Showdown series. Other not-so-good changes Because the Gen 4’s grip is thinner, the frame was also designed to be a little smaller , for which a smaller trigger group was designed. For this reason, a Gen 4’s trigger group would be too small to fit in any previous generation Glock frame. That part of the trigger bar that sticks out which deactivates the trigger safety for when the user pulls the trigger to shoot, that looks different now. The company put a little bulge on it to make sure the firing pin stays centered when striking a chambered bullet’s primer — this is so Gen 4 Glocks stay reliable even with the slightly slimmer frame profile. But it resulted in a slightly heavier trigger pull, which is why some people who own both Gen 3 and Gen 4 Glocks claim that the Gen 3’s trigger is slightly easier to pull . There are some who even file that little bulge smooth to get a lighter trigger pull. The ejector on newer Gen 4 frames is also a little smaller but thicker and has a more pronounced curvature. This wasn’t always the case. Glock only added this new ejector in later production Gen 4 frames because the earlier ones used the same ejector that Gen 3s use which didn’t work out the way they thought it would. Because of the slimmer frame and slightly modified internals, Gen 3 ejectors installed in early Gen 4s resulted in stovepipes (i.e. empty case is not getting properly pushed out of the ejection port, causing a jam). The company identified the problem to be the older version of the ejector not being compatible with the new frame and trigger group designs , so newer production Gen 4s were given the new ejector. The problem with this is people unfortunate enough to have bought early production Gen 4 models are stuck with a handgun that is a disgrace to the manufacturer’s reputation. All Glocks are supposed to be reliable, but their handgun stovepipes. The only fix for this issue is to buy a new trigger housing with the integrated new ejector design as an aftermarket drop-in upgrade ( Part no. 30274 ). Price In general, Gen 4 pistols cost more $$$ compared to Gen 3s. But since we’re only looking at Glock 19 for both generations, we’ll only be including the factory price for those two pistols here. As of this writing, on Glock’s website , the Glock 19 Gen 3 costs $475, while the Glock 19 Gen 4 costs $550. That’s a $75 increase which some might find unappealing, but we’ll get to this in a bit. So which one is better? Which slide finish is better between these handguns is a matter of personal taste. I prefer the darker shade of the Glock 19 Gen 3’s slide, but others don’t really care too much about the finish as long as the slide is protected from corrosion — that’s something I can agree with. So none of the two pistols gets a point here. The interchangeable backstraps that come with the Gen 4 Glock 19 might be helpful for people with bigger hands. I have medium-size hands so I don’t really care for it too much. Again, none of the two pistols gets a point here, at least for me. The new checkering texture on the Glock 19 Gen 4 looks and feels great. Some DIY gurus and tacticool gun nuts might argue that the Gen 3’s grip can be stippled , but DIY stippling is risky if you don’t know what you’re doing (you’ll just weaken the frame and ruin a working firearm), and having a qualified gunsmith do it for you can cost unnecessary expenses (I would be content with just using grip tape). So Gen 4 wins here , no doubt. Gen 3 Glock 19s having a smaller low-profile magazine release button wouldn’t be an issue if the user practices pushing it enough times, but the larger magazine release button on the Glock 19 Gen 4 is definitely an improvement. Another point for Gen 4. Gen 4 Glock 19s using the new double recoil spring assembly with the fatter guide rod is kind of pointless. Glock 19s are chambered for 9mm which is known for a relatively lower recoil compared to other more powerful handgun calibers . However, if you’re looking to upgrade to a 960 Rowland (a 9mm on steroids that can surpass .357 magnum ballistics), it might be useful. So another point for Gen 4. If you bought an early production Glock 19 Gen 4 though and you’re experiencing stovepipes, sorry to say this but you’re going to have to install that new trigger housing part (with the new ejector) to get it to work reliably. So much for owning a handgun that’s supposed to be reliable, huh? Gen 3 gets a point here, unfortunately. As for differences in price, the Glock 19 Gen 3 is $75 cheaper but it only comes with two magazines. The Glock 19 Gen 4 on the other hand is $75 more expensive but considering the factory upgrades and that it comes with three magazines, it’s not too bad. And if you have large hands and you can use the backstraps that come with it, you get even more bang for your buck! Thus, Gen 4 gains another point. Conclusion Glocks will never be perfect. The fact alone that they always have newer “generational” improvements should be proof enough. And I, for one, hate how they look. They’re never going to be the timeless beauties that the 1911s are. But Glocks don’t have to be perfect. These are highly reliable handguns priced just right. And the company listen to their customers, they never rest on their laurels. They just have to keep doing what they’ve been doing for over three decades. The Gen 4 Glock 19 (and all other Gen 4s) wins over its Gen 3 counterpart. With all the upgrades Glock has masterfully added into their newer Gen 4 pistols, even factoring in the slightly higher price tag, there really is no point in buying any Glock Gen 3s. However, they all share similar upgrades, and you might want to find out what are the best Glock sights , or the best Glock shoulder holsters , before buying them. However, the Gen 3 might be the better option if you’re like a lot of Gen 3 owners and: You can work with the smaller magazine release button just fine; You’re okay with spending extra on stippling the grip or doing it yourself or putting grip tape on it — or you don’t mind the less aggressive, almost non-existent grip texture; You’re a die-hard 9mm fan and you’re not looking to buy a 960 Rowland conversion barrel in the foreseeable future because you don’t see the point; You’re such a scrooge that you think the $75 markup on the Glock 19 Gen 4 is not worth it (or you’re just broke); Me being neutral and objective about all this (I’m not a Glock fan), I’ll have to say that the Glock 19 Gen 4 is the clear winner of this round. And it’s a well deserved win. If you’re looking to buy one of these, or already own a model, you might want to check out this article about the best Glock 19 holster . Related Reads: Glock 17 VS. Glock 19 Glock 19 VS. Glock 23 Glock 19 VS. 26 Glock 19 VS. Sig Sauer P320 5/5 (1 Review) Mike Ramientas A firearms and ballistics enthusiast and an outdoorsman, Mike is one of Gun News Daily's best contributing authors. He's a researcher, data analyst and writer by trade and strongly adheres to conservatism—a stalwart of the right to keep and bear arms. 6 COMMENTS Chris Biller July 11, 2018 at 7:49 am True, the Glock pistol is about the ugliest gun on the market. Shoot baby shoot, shoot it does . That all that matters. I still carry a colt commander, and full size colt. I carry my gen 3 in a Blade Tech. I own a gun store and by far, our best seller are Glocks Reply Mike Ramientas July 11, 2018 at 10:42 am Chris, thanks for reading the article. Yep, gotta love them commander Colts. I carry a commander-size 1911 myself (a customized Norinco tuned by a gunsmith friend) and I’m never going to replace it with any Glock. That said Glocks aren’t your gun store’s bestsellers for no reason, so we really got to give it to Gaston. Reply John Tibbetts January 6, 2019 at 9:38 am Mike, Thanks for the article on the Glock 19. I’ve been a shooter of the Springfield XD-9 for about 15 years now, but the extractor broke after only 6,000 rounds, so I’m going back to the Glock for its excellent reliability. I used to own and carry a Glock 17 gen 1 back in the ’90s when I worked at a gun store, and in just a few years I put several thousand rounds through it with out ever having a failure of any kind. I went with the XD because it feels better in my hand, but after its extractor reliability problem, I’m going with the Glock once again as my primary handgun. Reply Matthew McIntyre January 14, 2019 at 3:54 am You left out one undebatable reason to buy a Gen 3 over a Gen 4: the letters C & A. Can’t get Gen 4’s & 5’s in CA, only the Gen 3! Just learned that today while shopping… Reply Gertude November 28, 2019 at 3:27 am How did you find numerous details? I like how that you organize everything, since it’s really easy to read. All in all, I can recommend this guide to everybody who is interested in that topic. Reply Keith P. March 6, 2020 at 3:58 pm Have to disagree with your criteria. Reliability is king. Give me a gun that doesn’t jam every time over a gun with questionably improved grip stippling. Not sure you can declare a “clear winner” for a gun known for stovepiping. And definitely question how reliable it’s going to be converting to 960 Rowland when everything about the gun is precision designed around the 9mm parabellum cartridge. If you are guaranteed a later version of the Gen 4, then no problem. Price is an important factor too. The $75 difference can buy you a magwell, extended slide and mag release buttons, extra magazines, or maybe a nice concealed carry holster. Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

G43X And G48: Solidifying The Glock 9mm Slimline Series

G43X And G48: Solidifying The Glock 9mm Slimline Series

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379ceb6e518_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379ceb6e518_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Glock 43, Glock 43X and Glock 48 have burned like a prairie fire through the concealed carry market. Here's a look a what's driven their popularity. What Are The Difference Between Glock Slimline Nines: The G43 has a 3.41-inch barrel and 6-round capacity. The G43X has a 3.41-inch barrel and 10-round capacity. The G48 has a 4.17-inch barrel and 10-round capacity. The U.S. concealed-carry market has been booming for many years now, and it shows no signs of stopping. As the concealed-carry market has become more and more popular, so have the micro-compact guns that fill the segment, and no caliber is as popular as the 9mm. It’s a full-power load that is able to be packed into a small package, so it’s no wonder why it’s so popular. This post is an excerpt from Glock Reference Guide, 2nd Edition available at GunDigestStore.com . The Glock Slimline 9mms have been very popular, ever since their introduction, starting with the first Slimline 9mm, the G43, in 2015. The G43 design is based off the G42, a .380 ACP caliber. There was a slimline pistol prior to that, the G36, but its design was based off the original Glock. The G42 design (and thus the Slimline 9mm) is different from the traditional Glock design, incorporating significant design changes. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! The G43 came out just as the first edition of this book was going to print, and the Slimline 9mm lineup has now expanded to include the G43X and G48. Related GunDigest Articles "Baby Glock": Is The Glock 26 The Best Carry Double-Stack? 10 Advantages of the Glock 5 Game-Changing Glocks Learn More: Glock Reviews You Need To Read G43 Prior to the introduction of the G43, shooters had been clamoring for a single-stack 9mm Glock for years. And when Glock finally gave them one, in the form of the G43, people were lining up on waiting lists to get their hands on it. Glock took heat from a lot of fans after not releasing a single-stack 9mm at the 2015 SHOT show. Some took it a little too personally and filled the Internet forums with overdramatic vows never to buy another Glock. Further salt was thrown on the “wounds” of fans, by the other makers who have had single-stack 9mms on the market for several years now. I believe Glock was simply taking a little extra time to make sure it got it right, after taking a hit when the G42 had some issues coming out of the gate (mostly malfunctions when using overpowered and underpowered ammunition). It was easily remedied with modifications to a few parts, but Glock isn’t a company that takes well to having reliability issues. So, Glock engineers took a little extra time with this one, and judging by my experience, as well as what I’ve seen from others, with the G43, they got it right.

Best Survival Watch for 2020: Top 6 Picks, Buying Guide

When I was 14 years old, I went hunting with a friend and his dad. We were in an unfamiliar forested area. I tracked a buck for about two hours when I realized the clouds had dropped down to ground level. I decided it was time to return to camp. But, like I said, I was in unfamiliar territory. Night was not far away. I got so caught up in tracking that buck I lost track of where I was. For just a moment panic set in. Imagine yourself in my shoes. You’re on the move, running out of daylight. The weather has blocked your horizon. What’s your move? How will you get to safety? Take a breath. Check your watch. Relax. You can move confidently because your survival watch has the tools and reliability to get you moving in the right direction. It’s accurate, durable, and water-resistant. But how do you know what survival watch is for you? Prices range from under $40 to over $1200 and come with a wide variety of features. The first step is to decide on what features you need. Temperature gauge, date, altimeter, calendar, tides, barometer, tachymeter, GMT, and a rotating bezel are some of the options you should consider. But are they necessary for your situation? Do you already carry a GPS? Or have you been thinking about getting one? All these things matter and we will cover them in this guide. Before that, if you want to just check our top picks, here they are at a quick glance: WATCHES DETAILS #1 Watch #1 Watch Luminox Men's LM8822 Anti-reflective window. Clearly identifiable second count-down zone with dive-timing bezel. Illuminated face. Check Price on Amazon.com Casio Men's Pro Trek PRG-270-1 Battery Life: 9 months on full charge. Northerly calibration function. Full Auto LED (Super Illuminator) Backlight with Afterglow. Check Price on Amazon.com G-Shock Rangeman GW-9400 Mud Resistant Case &; buttons are sealed to prevent mud, dirt and dust from getting into the watch. 40 records Memory capacity. Protective mineral crystal dial window. Check Price on Amazon.com Quick Navigation Best Survival Watch: Top 6 Picks 1. Best Fitness Tracker Survival Watch – Bolt CAPACITOR Tactical Military Watch Review 2. Best Durable Survival Watch – Luminox Recon Pointman Watch Review 3. Best Solar Survival Watch – Casio Pro Trek Solar Watch Review 3. Best Budget Survival Watch – Casio G-Shock Rangeman GW-9400 Watch Review 5. "Best Survival Watch" for Hardcore Adventurers – Garmin Instinct Survival Watch Review 6. Survivor’s Choice – Casio G-SHOCK "Survival Watch Review" What You Need to Know about Survival Watches 1. The Survival Kit Watch 2. The G-shock watch 3. The Navigation watch Buying Guide Water Resistance Durability Power Features Verdict Best Survival Watch: Top 6 Picks Here are the reviews. 1. Best Fitness "Tracker Survival Watch" – Bolt CAPACITOR "Tactical Military Watch" Review Features: The Bolt Capacitor Tactical Military Watch is a great bargain.  A pedometer tracks your steps while the GPS guides your travel. A Calorie counter and heart rate sensor are also included. Your steps, heart rate, and calories burned are easy to see on the face. There’s a compass and the Capacitor is waterproof up to 50 meters. The dial is sapphire glass. The battery life ranges from 2-7 days depending on use. To sweeten the deal, you’re given a Tactical Belt Pouch & Phone Holder, a Safety Tactical Flashlight, and a Glass Breaking Tactical Pen when ordered from the Bolt website.  They also include Free Shipping Worldwide, Free Returns, and a Money-back guarantee. Pros: Low-cost GPS Easy to read dial Heartrate sensor, pedometer, and calorie counter included Cons: Screen Glare is a bit annoying, but because of the bold coloring it’s acceptable The one-inch band is a rubber material that can become sweaty and isn’t real durable Not available on Amazon 2. Best "Durable Survival Watch" – Luminox Recon "Pointman Watch Review" See Price on Amazon Features: Pointman is waterproof up to 660 feet and has Night Vision tube so you can clearly see the face in the dark. It’s a GMT watch with a rotating, carbon-reinforced bezel and silver-tone hands allow you to track both 12- and 24-hour time simultaneously. It also has a tachometer so you can track your walking speed. Its’ large compass is located on the band as is a ruler with inch and cm markings to help you with your map. Thanks to the anti-reflective sapphire crystal, your watch is easy to see in all conditions.  This Swiss-made watch features a rubber strap that is lightweight and flexible for great comfort and durability. Pros: Anti-reflective window Clearly identifiable second count-down zone with dive-timing bezel Illuminated face Carrying case included Night Vision Tubes last 25 years Cons: Not suitable for diving Glows constantly Walking tachymeter in metric units (Km) Some issues with bevel ring coming off Customer Sentiment: There was one main issue customers reported – the bevel ring. Don’t let that one past problem keep you from considering this great Luminox product. Customers love how easy it is to read and the overall fit and quality. Luminox Men's LM8822.MI Recon Point Black Watch Round watch featuring unidirectional rotating bezel with compass markings and black dial with... 45 mm polycarbonate case with anti-reflective sapphire dial window See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 15:49 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API 3. Best "Solar Survival Watch" – Casio Pro Trek "Solar Watch Review" See Price on Amazon Features: The Casio Pro Trek technology packs powerful little sensors that bring you greater energy efficiency and higher reading accuracy. Altitude, barometric pressure, and direction readings are more reliable than ever. The large buttons on the side for digital compass, barometric pressure and altitude, and temperature readings are easy to use. The Triple Sensor V3 is water-resistant to 100 meters, includes a stopwatch, five daily alarms, and 31 time zones. I love the LED backlighting with the Auto Illumination that makes viewing in low light a breeze. Pros: Battery Life: 9 months on full charge (without further exposure to light) Northerly calibration function Full Auto LED (Super Illuminator) Backlight with Afterglow Auto Calendar 5 Daily Alarms Cons: Some resetting issues reported Accuracy of altimeter is questionable Wrist band is small Customer Sentiment: Customers like the size of the watch and love all the great features for such a low price. Sale Casio Men's Pro Trek PRG-270-1 Tough Solar Triple Sensor Multifunction... Tough Solar Power,100M Water Resistant,Low Temperature Resistant (-10 C / 14 F),Module 3415,Approx.... Accuracy: +/- 15 seconds per month ,Full Auto Calendar (Pre-programmed until the year 2099),5 Daily... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 15:49 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API 3. Best "Budget Survival Watch" – Casio G-Shock Rangeman GW- "9400 Watch Review" See Price on Amazon Features: Rangeman watches stand up to the most brutal of conditions. Their Shock Resistant Triple Sensor, keeps altitude, barometric pressure, temperature and direction readings at your fingertips. Impact-resistance is built in with their cylindrical buttons that also makes it easy to use. You get a digital compass, altimeter, barometer, thermometer, sunrise and sunset date, time stamp, Mb6 atomic timekeeping, auto LED, 5 Daily Alarms, stop watch, countdown timer, day/date/month calendar, and buckle closure. It’s water resistant to 660 feet so you can take your Rangeman scuba diving with confidence. The black face has red accents on the dial and the side button for easy viewing. Add in sunrise/sunset data, one-touch time recording, one-touch elapsed time measurement, with G-Shock toughness and durability for one great survival watch. Pros: Mud "Resistant Case &" ; buttons are sealed to prevent mud, dirt and dust from getting into the watch 40 records Memory capacity Each sensor mode has its own audible tone, which means you can determine which mode you are entering without even looking at the watch. Protective mineral crystal dial window Solar-powered digital watch in stainless steel with multiple displays, red contrasts, and textured pushers Quartz movement with analog display Watch can stay fully functional anywhere from 5-23 months without exposure to any light Cons: Display can be difficult to read You have to take the watch off to get an accurate temperature reading Customer Sentiment: Users report being happy with every aspect of this durable and accurate watch that holds a charge like no other. Sale Casio Men's GW-9400-1CR Master of G Stainless Steel Solar Watch Solar-powered digital watch in stainless steel with multiple displays, red contrasts, and textured... Quartz movement with analog display See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 16:28 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API 5. Best Survival Watch for Hardcore Adventurers – Garmin Instinct Survival Watch Review See Price on Amazon Features: Garmin delivers awesome GPS functionality with rugged dependability. Built to meet U.S. Military standard 810G for thermal, shock and water resistance (rated to 100 meters), the Instinct will withstand the toughest environments. When you’re out trekking, ordinary GPS is no match to multiple global navigation satellite systems (GPS, Glonass and Galileo) to get you on the right track. You also get a built in 3-axis compass and barometric altimeter, heart rate, activity and stress monitors, and the ability to stay connected with a compatible smartphone. Automatic data uploads to the Garmin connect online fitness community are included as well. ­­­­Pros: Multiple global navigation satellite systems TracBack feature to navigate the same route back to your starting point Garmin Explore website and app to plan your trips in advance Battery life: Up to 14 days in smartwatch mode, up to 16 hours in GPS mode, up to 40 hours in Ultratrac battery saver mode Silicone strap material Sleep tracking and other fitness tracking features Cons: Monochrome screen The Band isn’t the most comfortable Compass quality is only decent Customer Sentiment: Owners remark about how great this watch is. Features and battery life were noted often as the reason for the high rating. They are very excited about what this watch does for them. Garmin Instinct Rugged Outdoor Watch w/GPS and Heart Rate Monitoring Sea... GARMIN AUTHORIZED DEALER - Includes Full GARMIN USA WARRANTY "Garmin Instinct Rugged" GPS Watch Built to Withstand the Toughest Environments See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 16:28 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API 6. Survivor’s Choice – Casio G-SHOCK Survival Watch Review See Price on Amazon Features: Besides the Triple Sensor, the new GPR-B1000 is capable of GPS navigation—a first for a G-SHOCK watch to take your explorations to the next level. Data is collected from GPS satellites to show your current route in real-time. You can use Bluetooth to pair your smartphone to link the G-SHOCK Connected app where you it’s easy to create routes and manage log data. Being able to see tracks and point data as a timeline or on a 3D map makes the GPS easy to use and understand. As part of the “Master of G” series, this watch will work for you through the toughest of conditions. It’s water-resistant to 200 meters and shock-resistant. "The Triple Sensor" measures compass bearing, atmospheric pressure/altitude, and temperature, based on the concept of “Survival Toughness.” Not only does it have wireless charging, but it also includes a solar charging system. A wireless charge of five hours provides you GPS for up to 33 hours. If you’re outdoors when your battery level drops below a usable level for GPS, solar charging can be used to resume GPS functions for a limited time. There’s no need for concern about your time display because it will be kept going with solar charging, regardless of the status of GPS functions. Pros: 200-meter water-resistant Shock-resistant 39 time zones, and the ability to shut daylight saving on/off 24 hours Countdown Timer Solar charging Dust- and mud-resistant structure Carbon fiber insert band Cons: A bit pricey Customer Sentiment: This is the one watch customers love EVERY thing about it. Great fit, features, dial, battery, durability. It performs and looks great. Casio G-SHOCK RANGEMAN Solar-Assisted GPS Navigation GPR-B1000-1JR Mens... 200-meter water-resistant Shock-resistant See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 16:28 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API What You Need to Know about Survival Watches There are three general categories of survival watches with many that are a mix of the three. 1. The Survival Kit Watch These watches are also known as paracord watches. They come with an assortment of tools, such as a compass, whistle, thermometer, scraper, and paracord rope. There are a few issues many people have with this type of watch. First of all, the tools included are generally low quality. Next, the bulkiness and lack of a good fit of the paracord band around the wrist can be very annoying. Then there is the small size of the compass.  I recommend that you carry a good quality paracord and the few other tools you need in your pack instead. In a bug-out situation, you’re trusting your life to your tools. Don’t sacrifice your survival for a few dollars. 2. The G-shock watch Built to withstand challenging environments, these are favored by military people. They are water and shock-resistant. The materials used to create these watches give you confidence they will withstand the punishment of outdoor survival. Check that the ones you’re considering come with the tools you need. Be prepared to pay more as you include more features. 3. The Navigation watch I’m restricting these to watches with a GPS system built in. If you’re into hiking, skiing, biking, or other sports that take you out into the wild, then having the ability to preset your course is a great asset. Many of these watches offer a long battery life and include options such as heartrate monitoring. Buying Guide In order to make this list, these watches had to meet minimum requirements designed to save your butt in a bugout situation. I chose four areas to focus on. I explain each of those areas below. For this guide, I decided to consider GPS as an additional feature because of the cost. Water Resistance The first requirement of my top picks is that the watch is water resistant. In the wild you don’t know what kind of conditions you may face. Rain, snow, fog, and water crossings can’t mean the end of your survival tool. Each of my picks is water-resistance at no less than 50 feet. Durability Next up is durability. Your survival watch must survive harsh conditions. You never know when or where your watch will save you, so it has to hold up beyond normal wear and tear. Look for shock-resistance, crystal faces, and a durable strap that will ensure your survival tool meets your heavy demands. Power My Power requirement simply refers to battery life. A great survival tool is useless if it doesn’t run. Survivor watches with solar charging are available. You’ll usually find solar available on better GPS watches which demand a lot of power. Here’s the bottom line: I’ve carried extra batteries and it was a huge hassle. Features Finally, in order to qualify as a survival watch, there are features that must be included. Each of the Survival watches I’ve chosen includes a compass and a tachymeter or GPS. Because surviving a bug-out situation could depend on weather conditions I recommend you consider a watch that also includes a barometer and altimeter. I’ve included a price for reference. Those may change and I don’t guarantee them. At the end of each review there’s a section about what others think of the product. I viewed hundreds of reviews and summed up the general consensus of product owners. One final note, I left out the very low end watches because they don’t meet the quality aspects you need in a bugout situation. Verdict I wouldn’t hesitate to purchase any of these six watches. But, since I’m only going to wear one at a time, it’s the Casio G-Shock Rangeman GW-9400 that is my choice. I hike, hunt, and fish all over the world and in many extreme environments, so I need to trust my tools. Known for its’ rugged durability and advance technological features, the 9400 is an unmatched value. Other interesting articles: Best Kabar Knives Review: Top 5 Picks and Buying Guide for 2020 Best Survival Blanket: Top Picks, Why Use One, Buying Guide Best Survival Boots: Buying Guide, Need To Knows in 2020 Top 6 Best Survival Gloves: Reviews, Buying Guide

The Rebuilding Survivors

The rebuilding of society after a catastrophic event is something that we have not explored @ SurvivalCache until now.  Regulator5 takes a hard look at the worst case scenario and what it will take to rebuild for the future.  Please join in on the discussion. We have all discussed the need to establish stockpiles of food, water, fuel, ammunition, along with other items and equipment to ensure our personal (and family) survival in the event of a natural disaster, or worse, a TEOTWAWKI (The End Of The World As We Know It) event.  I have even written a few articles to bring some of my thoughts and ideas to the table for discussion and hopefully, even some learning.  I am going to direct this article as more of an editorial and opinion to bring to light some thoughts I see “under discussed” by most of the preppers I have spoken to. While preparing your stockpiles and learning the skills needed to survive a long term event, plan for the reestablishment of society.  I may use terms that some will find confusing or even rail against due to their personal beliefs; I only ask you think about the idea and look past my personal vocabulary. Our personal survival is only the immediate reaction to the event at hand.  During a regional or local disaster, like a tornado , flash flood, hurricane, earthquake, or even a small scale terrorist attack; these are the skill sets and items needed to survive.  In the rare case of an actual TEOTWAWKI, our preparations must be much more in depth and far reaching.  I had touched on this briefly in a previous article but wanted to expand on this to generate more comments and ideas based on this subject. While serving in the military, I knew the chances were at least even that I could be killed.  I was not alone in this knowledge; most who serve do so with a greater purpose than themselves in mind.  We know that survival is more than just “coming home”.  Most volunteer for the survival of their families, neighbors, communities, nation and civility; this last part may seem odd with the violence of war, but when the fighting ends, we hope to return to our normal life.  In recent times, the threat of war has not deterred people and nations from becoming or acting uncivilized to their fellow man. Soldiers “know” that even if they “fall”, their nation will survive; which is what makes it possible to do the things they do.  None want to feel their death will be in vain by knowing their sacrifice went unrewarded by the “death” of their nation.  I feel this is the root of the bond that forms among the members of military units, some more than others. Quick Navigation The Reestablishment of Society Council of Elders Community Emergency Response Teams The Reestablishment of Society I suspect that after such a catastrophic event and societal collapse; there will be 6 months to a year before we can rebuild.  I base this on a few theories and ideas: 1) We should be able to maintain some semblance of order, even if only on a local scale. 2) Our infrastructure should remain relatively intact, barring an outright military invasion/war 3) The gangs and “warlords” should be routed and only the people wanting to bring society back will be left (my hopes). We will still have renegades and outlaws, as we do now, but I have faith in the people to withstand the onslaught of the cowards in gangs and the bullies who plan on preying upon the others because they lacked the foresight, courage and competence to prepare themselves.  Many small towns and communities may be unaffected by the event, other than losing power due to national power grid failure .  They will also be spared the burden of most of the gangs initially but only in the beginning, as the unprepared have to move on to find an area they have not already plundered.  The time free of this cancer on society will allow for the implementation of defenses and maintaining some semblance of civilized society.  The People must use these “safe zones” as the foundation blocks to rebuild the nation. By utilizing our existing infrastructure, we will not have the 200 years of building a nation from the ground up.  We should be able to rebuild within a decade of the event.  I know the government has plans in place and supposedly the “experts” for rebuilding, but we all remember the fiasco of even such a regional disaster as Hurricane Katrina .  We also have history from Somalia, Iraq, Sudan, and countless other examples from the past to demonstrate that the current power players are incapable at producing any positive results in rebuilding a society. Something to think about would be having textbooks on hand for teaching our children after the event.  We only think the education system is broken, but at least they are able to teach most children the basics, such as the alphabet, basic math, and reading.  Some may be lucky enough to have textbooks on hand from their children if the event occurs, but I like the older textbooks personally.  They are more complete, more honest (in my opinion), and seem to use a simpler approach to educating. Libraries will be another asset that will be looted and their books burnt by ill prepared people looking for heat and cooking fuel.  Depending on the event, we must preserve our literature for future generations, as these will contain the knowledge and experiences of our Founding Fathers and those that built the nation with their hard work and courage. Council of Elders I feel that the Elders of your group will bring a vast knowledge and experience base to the table. We all have family or close friends that may or may not be able to perform full duties on the security team, but may offer other skills and experiences to the group.  My granddad passed away during my tour to Iraq in 2008, but he was a superb gardener even in his 80’s.  He was a combat vet from WW2 and even though physically would have been challenged to perform defensive combat duties, his experience could have been used for training for a TEOTWAWKI type event.  My other Granddad was a mechanic and passed along that skill to all of us who would listen.  These Elders also have such a vast well of knowledge about what has worked and has not worked in the past, whether by personal trial or the government exacting laws and regulations that were eventually dismissed or repealed. We must tap that knowledge when we reestablish our government and return to “normal life”. We should not repeat past mistakes and with several thousand years of “learning” by past societies; we should be able to rebuild into the “more perfect union” envisioned by our Founding Fathers. Elders have been looked to since the beginning of time by villages and tribes to make decisions for the entire population or at least give their insight to the chief to aid in his making the decisions.  Our current government model follows this idea loosely; advisers are picked more on connections, favors or group affiliations instead of knowledge, ability and intelligence. Elders are not necessarily the oldest person, but anyone who can bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to the table and the ability to share this with the group.  Remember, after the event is over and mankind can rebuild, these will be our individual representatives to the “Constitutional Convention”.  We will need thinkers and doers and people not easily pushed aside to stop our ideas from being heard.   They will need to be diplomats and “parents” (being firm but fair and capable of educating others). "Community Emergency Response" Teams These teams are already established in some cities and/or counties.  The CERT program offers training, usually for free, and helps people prepare for disasters and be prepared to help their families, friends and neighbors if such an event happens.  If you do not live in a locale that has an established team, check with your state’s Emergency Planning department to help set one up for your small town.  The teams can be organized through your town, neighborhood, church, etc.  This will help create a foundation for people to link together for the common good and common defense if a TEOTWAWKI event takes place or a major SHTF event at a local or regional level. These teams can be very loosely organized or very organized (preferred).  Everyone in the teams would bring valuable skills, knowledge, and ideas to the group, as well as adding to the Search and Rescue ability of the community.  If no major disaster strikes and the worst scenario the team is used for is locating a lost hiker; we as a society are still better off. If everyone on the teams feels the same about prepping, they will offer a stronger and well rounded group for a major calamity. If not everyone feels like prepping, some probably will and this will give you contacts that may have been missed if not given this avenue of discussion and acquaintance. This is by no means an exact theory, just my opinion.  I hope to open the dialogue and hear what others add to this discussion. We are currently working on starting a CERT team via our Church.  I know some preppers avoid religion and I will not push my beliefs.  The bible says to do charitable works and I see this as being able to accomplish this item and get others involved in prepping.  As for being prepared for defense at the same time, “They which builded on the wall, and they that bare burdens, with those that laded, every one with one of his hands wrought in the work, and with the other hand held a weapon” Nehemiah 4:17 KJV. Please share your ideas on rebuilding society below. Regulator5 Stay Alert, Stay Alive Also from Regulator5 Read: Looking to Our Past Part 1 Survival Eating 3 Things Every Bug Out Bag Needs JOIN THE DISCUSSION ON FACEBOOK TODAY!!! Photos by: LetMeTakeYourFotograf Ellie Goff Reynatippetts SgtStryker.com Mr Smashy Other interesting articles: 6 Survival Tips We Can Learn From Our Forefathers 8 Best States for When SHTF – No Place Like Home! Book Review: Lights Out 3 Reasons You Shouldn’t Stock Precious Metals

Summary

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